Staten Island:

Wednesday and Friday
11am - 7pm
New patients, office visits and immunotherapy shots.

Phone: 718-816-8200

Brooklyn Heights:

Tuesday and Thursday
1pm - 7pm

Phone: 718-624-6495

Bay Ridge:

Mon, Tue and Thu
1:30pm - 7pm

Phone: 718-748-7551


Allergy Treatment

Step 1: Consultation

We will gather important information about you, your symptoms, triggers and medical history, along with any medications you may be taking. Some insurances require referrals from your primary physician, before we can see you.
 
Step 2: Testing

Based on your symptoms and history, we will construct an effective, yet safe plan for testing and confirming your allergies. Testing may consist of any combination of blood tests, skin prick testing, intradermal testing, or patch testing, all depending on your condition.

Step 3: Treatment

This is the step where your allergic symptoms and you get better. Allergy treatments are of three types: Prevention. Medication. Immunotherapy.

Prevention: Once identified, the cause of the symptoms may be avoided or removed from your life. For example, a particular food can be avoided, or a pet can be removed from the home or kept away from sleeping areas.

Some causes of allergic symptoms, such as pollen, molds and dust mites, cannot be completely eliminated and are difficult to avoid. Exposure can be reduced, however, by environmental control measures prescribed by your allergist.

Medication: Although prevention comes first, more may be needed. Medications are usually used to decrease allergy symptoms and improve the patient's quality of life, recent advances in medications for asthma and other allergic diseases have been phenomenal. Improvements in drugs have eliminated most of the side effects from older drugs.

Immunotherapy ("allergy shots"): If a specific allergy is identified and it cannot be avoided or medications are not sufficient to restore your health, the allergic symptoms may be controlled or eliminated with allergy shots.

An extract of a small amount of the allergen is injected into the skin of the arm. An injection may be given once a week (sometimes more often) for about 30 weeks, after which injections can be administered every two weeks. Eventually, injections can be given every four weeks. The duration of therapy may be three to five years, sometimes longer.

There is a small danger of anaphylactic shock (a severe allergic reaction) shortly after an injection. Therefore, immunotherapy requires medical supervision.