Staten Island:

Wednesday and Friday
11am - 7pm
New patients, office visits and immunotherapy shots.

Phone: 718-816-8200

Brooklyn Heights:

Tuesday and Thursday
1pm - 7pm

Phone: 718-624-6495

Bay Ridge:

Mon, Tue and Thu
1:30pm - 7pm

Phone: 718-748-7551


Food Allergy Diagnosis

Diagnosing food allergies can be as complicated as the medical condition itself. Symptoms of food allergy can vary from person to person, and a single individual may not always experience the same symptoms during every reaction. Food allergic reactions can affect the skin, respiratory tract, gastrointestinal tract, and/or cardiovascular system, and people develop food allergies at various ages.

Diagnostic food allergy testing offers clues about the causes of symptoms, but it cannot determine whether someone has a food allergy with absolute certainty without a challenged study. Still, when a food allergy is suspected, it’s critically important to consult with an allergist who can determine which food allergy tests to perform, determine if food allergy exists, and counsel patients on food allergy management once the diagnosis has been established.

To make a diagnosis, we ask detailed questions about the history of allergy symptoms. Be prepared to answer questions about the specific foods and the quantities you consumed, the length of time that it took for symptoms to develop, the symptoms themselves, and how long they lasted. Your doctor will usually order a blood test (such as an ImmunoCAP test) and/or perform a skin prick food allergy tests, which indicate whether food-specific IgE antibodies are present in your body.

While both of these diagnostic tools can signal a food allergy, neither is conclusive. A positive test result to a specific food does not always indicate that a patient will react to that food when it’s eaten. A negative test is more helpful to rule out a food allergy. Neither test, by its level of IgE antibodies or the size of the wheal, necessarily predicts the severity of a food allergic reaction.