Staten Island:

Wednesday and Friday
11am - 7pm
New patients, office visits and immunotherapy shots.

Phone: 718-816-8200

Brooklyn Heights:

Tuesday and Thursday
1pm - 7pm

Phone: 718-624-6495

Bay Ridge:

Mon, Tue and Thu
1:30pm - 7pm

Phone: 718-748-7551


Food Allergy Treatment

Once a food allergy is certain, the best treatment is to avoid the food. You need to carefully check ingredient labels of food products. You should learn other names for the food or foods that you and your doctor think it best to avoid to be sure not to eat them.

When you eat out, you should be extra careful. Waiters (and sometimes the kitchen staff) may not always know every dish ingredient on the restaurant’s menu. Sometimes, even walking into a kitchen or an eatery where food is being prepared can cause a dangerous reaction. Vapor may carry extremely small particles that can be harmful.

What if I eat a food I'm allergic to?

You need to have a clear plan of action in case you eat a food you shouldn’t. Place a list of symptoms and your doctor’s instructions for treatment within easy reach in your kitchen. Medications can be very useful in treating many early symptoms of mild food allergies.

If you have had severe allergic reactions, you need to know when and how to give yourself a shot of epinephrine (adrenaline) to treat a severe reaction. You should go to the hospital or call 9-1-1 and arrange for follow-up care when the reaction is severe. Bracelets or necklaces may be worn to quickly alert medical personnel or other caretakers about food allergies.

Will I ever be able to eat these foods again?

Over time, allergies to cow’s milk, eggs and soy may disappear. Allergies to peanuts, tree nuts, fish and shellfish typically last a lifetime. About one-third of children and adults who had food allergies at some point are eventually free from food allergies after very carefully avoiding the foods.

Once you have had a severe, sudden, life-threatening reaction to a certain food you may be advised to never again eat this food. In some very allergic persons, a very small quantity of a food can produce a life-threatening reaction.

Researchers are now studying ways to go beyond today's methods of treating allergies. Food allergy research may soon produce new and better ways to block the body's allergic response by reducing or inhibiting the release of histamine and other chemicals that cause allergic reactions.